Connemara Driving Ponies

Connemara Driving Ponies

Friday, 4 October 2013

Fees for Double Dilute? [New thread -Posted by Finola]

 'The dreaded' Blue eyed creams are only a result of two cream genes being present in the one pony. They are not blind, nor is a blue-eyed human. One cream gene gets you the so -called 'Dun' ( properly called a buckskin, as true dun is a different gene ). These buckskins are highly prized for their coat colour, but double up on the dilute gene and the pony is practically regarded as a leper. I resent having to pay the same inspection fee for a double dilute pony, knowing that purely due to outdated and unscientific prejudice, he/ she is denied the right to be considered for Class One.

4 comments:

  1. For those wanting to know more about HWSS (Hoof Wall Separation System
    ), here is information on the research to date organized by the Connemara Pony Research Group. The Connemara Pony Research Group is a group of Connemara breeders and owners worldwide who have had this disease over the past 15 to 20 years. http://connemara-pony.blogspot.ca/2013_07_01_archive.html

    ReplyDelete
  2. Outside of Ireland everyone is amazed at the ignorance demonstrated by the CPBS Council of simple scientific genetic principles that were first proven in the mid-1800's and today are taught and understood by high school students the world over. Ironically, the favoured colour for Connemara ponies in Ireland, grey, is strongly genetically pre-disposed to melanoma. Logically, as this is such a strongly inherited condition, all grey ponies should automatically fail the veterinary inspection and be placed into Class 3, and under existing CPBS rules, their descendants not allowed to move out of this class. It would make more sense genetically than the current approach to the veterinary inspection and the approach to BEC ponies. on Fees for Double Dilute?

    ReplyDelete
  3. With the limited gene pool, failing all greys at the vet inspection is unworkable, but it would be wise to implement a policy of at least identifying homozygous greys, and mating them to non-greys only. Two heterozygous greys can, after all, produce non-grey offspring (25% chance ), so banning those for life into Class 3 would be illogical in the extreme.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Yes I agree would makes as much sense as keeping homozygous greys in Class 3

    ReplyDelete

Or you may start a new thread/topic of your own by putting 'New Thread' at the start of your comment under latest post..